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marc
2008.09.07, 01:14 PM
Hello there. A ball bearing, is a ball bearing, is a ball bearing. Right? They are all designed to reduce rotational friction thus lessening the drag on the motors, giving the motors/batteries longer life correct?
So what's the difference between, ceramic, sealed, Kyosho's, Atomics, PN's, GPM's, et'c, et'c. Who's the best, who's the worst, who's the same?
Only difference with the sealed bearings that I see, is the carpet dust doesn't get into theme, thus less maintanance.
I was going to watch an episode of "How It's Made" that showed in the title ball bearings. But when I watched it, there were no ball bearings in it.
So if there are any bearing experts out there, please explain to me all the different bearings and advantages to one over the other.
I usually tend to stick with whatever bearings I can get the cheapest. But recently got I think are PN's high-speed bearings and they seem pretty good. I can't tell really between the Kyosho bearings, and the bearings I got in my recent package. I like Kyosho's bearings, but their expensive, I think around 35-40 a pack! OUCH!
If this has all been explained before, please direct me to the thread. With racing season just started yesterday, I want to make sure both my RM and MM car's are set up to their highest potential, without costing an arm and a legg. :D

blt456
2008.09.07, 01:35 PM
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marc
2008.09.07, 01:41 PM
Thank you. So what bearings are worth the extra price, and what aren't? How often do you have to clean the none-sealed bearings? When I get home from every race, I take our shop's air compressor and spray the entire car clean, seems to clean the bearings out too. Don't worry, I'm carefully at not over spinning theme. I also have a spray can Magnum Force2 that's designed for cleaning electronics and bearings.

mk2kompressor
2008.09.07, 02:14 PM
be carefull with the compressor,it can blow stuff into places you wouldnt dream of;)

ceramic bearings last longer,are rounder and lighter than normal steel:)

marc
2008.09.09, 09:33 AM
I'm looking for inexpensive bearings for my 934 project. Which ones are best for best price? I don't want the you get what you paid for, I don't want cheap junk, and I dont want expensive Kyosho none-sealed ones. What do you recommend? Something with little maintanance would be nice.

CristianTabush
2008.09.09, 12:03 PM
Hands down price point wise, and performance- wise there is no bearing that is better than the Avid bearings. They are very comparable to ceramics at 1/4 of the price. Ceramics, DO NOT make a difference on the track. (Sorry to let the cat out of the bag and disappoint so many people). Our Avid bearings will spin as much as the Ceramics in Atomic Mods video (which btw ARE NOT Atomic bearings, and notice in that video how one car has plastic wheels with regular grease packed bearings and the other one has cleaned out ceramics with an aluminum wheel.)

EMU
2008.09.09, 12:35 PM
The Avids are my bearing of choice ;) The PN ones are about the same price, but have more slop, as do that Atomics.

The main thing I look for when choosing bearings is not only how much they spin, but how much slop the wheels have when they are installed. The Avids spin free, and have very little slop. Kind of like the old MZR dry bearings, which were the best bearings for a long time.

I have a few ceramic sets, and honestly... I notice no difference between them and the Avids. For the price, you cant go wrong. Just another example of Reflex bringing the cost of having a competetive car down. I like to have spare wheels with bearings installed and tires glued to them to do quick setup adjustments when at the track. The Avid bearings price point makes it easy to do that. Imagine doing that with ceramics, you would end up spending a few hundered. They are also available individually, which makes it even easier, so you dont have the 3mm ID bearings wasted.

My Nascar wheels with the Avid bearings spin just as long if not longer than the Ceramics in the Atomicmods video.

marc
2008.09.09, 01:01 PM
So Cristian, what are the bearings I got in my recent package? They seem to spin nicely.

color01
2008.09.12, 04:35 PM
+1 on the Avid bearings. In terms of spinning freely, they are a VERY close 2nd to the older MZR dry bearings, but on the track there is no performance difference. The difference is that the Avids last longer between cleanings (pleasant surprise, as the Avids are only half shielded), and as EMU said you can buy separate bearings as spares for your other wheels.

I actually thought the Avids were better than the ceramics I tested. Especially for the front wheels, the ceramics tended to drag, and make the rear end come out easily. No such problem with the Avids. :cool:

pfcparts
2008.09.17, 09:02 PM
Per my experience:

Bearings are all pretty close if you run them dry.
Was initially a fan of ceramics, but they just
cost too much and normal sets are getting
better...

MR 02-

PN ceramics (if cleaned and maintained)
Avid (not far off)
Atomic ceramics
Atomic dried
PN dried

Looking for a 02 set of Squat gold set to try
out but those are always sold out...

Top Choice: Avid simply due to price

MA010-

Diff bearings-

***Stock ones- If dried and you are
lucky enough to have a great set, they
can actually beat the Squat Golds! :eek:

Squat golds
Atomic ceramics (slight problem with
housings sometimes coming off which
can cause binding)
Atomic dried
PN ceramics

Top choice: A dried stock set

Knuckle bearings-

Squat gold
Squat dry
PN ceramics
Atomic ceramics
Atomic dried

Top choice: Squat gold or Squat dry set

Shaft bearings:
Atomic ceramics
Squat dry
Atomic dried
PN ceramics

Top choice: Squat dry set

Best 010 set up would be dried stock diff
bearings and a set of Squat dry bearings.

Note for the awd - PN ceramics (and atm
ceramics) are not that much better than a
dried set of any brand. Ceramics aren't
worth it on the awd as each set is
ridiculously priced with not much more
performance.

K bearings are overly expensive and not
reliable... I've had a few sets crap on the
awd and 02 and I cleaned them religiously lol.


parts

Tjay
2008.09.18, 12:10 AM
For racing:

AWD stock (if running highest gear ratio) -> ceramic bearings. Lighter. Less stress on the motor to spin shaft, wheels, diff, etc...

2wd mod/stock -> any bearings that are open on both sides and run them dry.

For practice:

Any closed steel bearings. Less maintenance.

phea
2008.09.18, 02:57 AM
I recently tried some regular steel bearings by Atomic for my MR-02. Out of the package they span like ceramic bearings. I didn't add any oil or take off the casing to run them open. The front end wheels would spin for a good 20 seconds. I may of just got a good batch but if you looking for a brand, ATM may be the way to go.

marc
2008.09.18, 10:10 AM
Thank's guy's. I've had no issues with any of the bearings I've purchased in the past. But I think I like the ones that came with my Refelx Racing package best.
My only issues is that I noticed some dont' fit some wheels right. Well, they fit, but are an itch to install/remove. Some go in very easily and fall out very easily. Seems like you can't really mix brand A bearings with brand B wheels or something.
What's the best spray cleaner for bearings? I've mentioned this stuff called MagnumForce2 which is an electronics/bearing cleaner. And how often should you clean theme? When ever you clean your car, or what? I race probably twice a month and I race on my home track almost every other day.

Tjay
2008.09.18, 11:14 AM
I recently tried some regular steel bearings by Atomic for my MR-02. Out of the package they span like ceramic bearings. I didn't add any oil or take off the casing to run them open. The front end wheels would spin for a good 20 seconds. I may of just got a good batch but if you looking for a brand, ATM may be the way to go.


Now, try buying another set of atm bearings then soak it on a motor cleaner and roll it dry. ;)

marc
2008.09.22, 05:31 PM
What's the best tool for installing/removing bearings? I've seen a motor bearing tool, but not one for wheels.

EMU
2008.09.22, 07:09 PM
I use an old steel ball diff shaft. What I dont use though is a philips screwdriver, I messed up a few bearings in the beginning doing it that way.

When removing the bearings, I remove the one inside the hub first (easier to remove), then press the outside one out with the diff shaft.

To install, I use a wheelnut tool, so I am pressing the outside race into the wheel, and not deforming the bearing.

lugnutz
2008.09.22, 08:41 PM
i use a 6mm reamer on my rims before i install the bearings,this way removal is easier and also there is no pressure on the bearing causing it to bind,now the bearing will spin alot smoother

ProfoxCG
2008.09.30, 04:00 PM
I use an old steel ball diff shaft. What I dont use though is a philips screwdriver, I messed up a few bearings in the beginning doing it that way.

When removing the bearings, I remove the one inside the hub first (easier to remove), then press the outside one out with the diff shaft.

To install, I use a wheelnut tool, so I am pressing the outside race into the wheel, and not deforming the bearing.

can you post a picture of the "press" you have are you talking about the regular purple plastic tool? also how do you use the dif shaft to push things out?

on a separate note, do mini-z bearing need to be cleaned regularly? how do you tell a bad bearing from a new bearing? (or a deformed bearing for that matter)?

I bought some PN bearing last night and suprisingly the wheels spin more with plastic bushings.