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Mini-Me-Zee
2008.10.31, 11:53 AM
Hi,

I would like to use a Futaba 2PL AM transmitter for a Mini Z to be driven by a young family member. I figured I could program in a maximum throttle of 30-40% to keep the top end speed down, and adjust it as the driver gains experience. One person told me that this could damage the speed control, but his explanation as to why escapes me.

Could I in fact damage the Mini Z's speed control if I dial down maximum speed with my computer transmitter?

Thank you!

Tim Johnson
2008.10.31, 12:04 PM
The PCB board will get a little warmer than if you were to drive around at full throttle the whole time. Damage would only be caused if you have a "hot" motor installed.

I would suggest that you use the ECO motor (MZ902) when you "dial" out the car. The ECO motor is slower, and draws less current. This will keep your PCB cooler as well.

EMU
2008.10.31, 12:43 PM
Where would he get the Eco motor, I have yet to see it for sale seperately.

Tim Johnson
2008.10.31, 12:54 PM
We just received the ECO motors. So they have not made it to the LHS yet.

Mini-Me-Zee
2008.10.31, 03:16 PM
Hi Tim,

Thank you for the very quick reply. I have a couple of other questions.

Can you explain why the PCB would get warm? I am a total electronics newb, so assume I know nothing :(

Second, would the PCB get warm if I simply limited the backward travel on the trigger of the stock Perfex transmitter?

I appreciate the suggestion of the Eco motor, but I just want to avoid having to change out motors depending on who drives the Mini Z (someone else might decide the Eco is too slow).

I am just weighing my different options.

Thank you.

Tim Johnson
2008.11.03, 12:10 PM
Anytime you drive around at less than full throttle you are putting stress on the FETs of the PCB. Reason being is the PCB has to constantly keep the voltage low to the motor. The unused energy is turned into heat. This is a "simple" explanation.

Mini-Me-Zee
2008.11.03, 05:07 PM
Thanks for the explanation, Tim!