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View Full Version : FET soldering iron?


WhiteSatin
2009.05.28, 11:45 PM
Hey guys, what soldering irons are you using for fets? My smallest is definitely too big for this job (you'd think with 7 irons, one would be suitable, but no..), so I have to buy a new one, something cheap. And no none of mine have suitable tips available.

I looked up the one Atomic uses, it's $100, way too much for me to pay for something I'm going to use twice.

Also, is the easiest/most accepted way to do this still to remove the fets to stack them, or has anyone decided it's easier to leave them on the board and solder new ones on top?

Thanks
Chris

briankstan
2009.05.28, 11:59 PM
I've done many fet replacement/repairs with an old wood burning iron. I just ground down the tip, they don't last long but they are cheap.

I've since upgraded to a nice madell, but it's close to the $100 range.

joey
2009.05.29, 12:25 AM
ive used a hakko or weller, basically anything with a fine tip and adjustable heat range is good for fets you dont want to overheat the fets when installing them..

stevenh
2009.05.29, 04:22 AM
What heat range do you guys use?
I did my FETs on my MR-02, not a very neat job but seems to work... first time round I prob heat damaged one of the fets cause i was trying to clean it up, replaced it and it started working.
Power seems to be a bit on the low side though... dunno if it's my new batteries... Team Orion 900HV... feels weaker than my Energizers...

bermbuster
2009.05.29, 06:52 AM
Hey guys, what soldering irons are you using for fets? My smallest is definitely too big for this job (you'd think with 7 irons, one would be suitable, but no..), so I have to buy a new one, something cheap. And no none of mine have suitable tips available.

I looked up the one Atomic uses, it's $100, way too much for me to pay for something I'm going to use twice.

Also, is the easiest/most accepted way to do this still to remove the fets to stack them, or has anyone decided it's easier to leave them on the board and solder new ones on top?

Thanks
Chris
If you have 7 irons you should be able just to replace the tip on one of them....Todays FETs came a long way since the AM days. If you have an ASF car you really dont need to stack FETs. The only FET work I have seen lately are replacements. If you stuff a board and get stuck dont try to motor out of it....a stalled mini z trying to move will burn a FET pretty quick.

WhiteSatin
2009.06.03, 06:01 AM
If you have 7 irons you should be able just to replace the tip on one of them....Todays FETs came a long way since the AM days. If you have an ASF car you really dont need to stack FETs. The only FET work I have seen lately are replacements. If you stuff a board and get stuck dont try to motor out of it....a stalled mini z trying to move will burn a FET pretty quick.

You'd think that. 1 is a cheap weller, tip isn't removable. 1 is a 100watt for sub C packs, huge tips, around 800 degrees. Another is about 20 years old, tips aren't made anymore. Another is one of the gun types, too heavy for fine detail work. Another is some radio shack cheapo, tips aren't removable. Another weller, no tips small enough are made. The last is a 350w, for soldering things like water pipe.

Quite a number of people, on here and other websites, have said that even a stock PN motor greatly benefits from stacked fets. Are they all wrong, imagining the improved performance?

Rune
2009.06.03, 07:03 AM
I use Metcal and OKI. These are in my opinion some of the best out there. We use them for electronics manufacturing.

For simple FET changes etc you can easy get away with a cheaper Hakko or Weller. Adjustable temperature range, and a couple of different size tips. Then you can solder almost anything.
40 to 60W is enough for most electronics.

Skv012a
2009.06.07, 09:30 PM
I use Metcal and OKI. These are in my opinion some of the best out there. We use them for electronics manufacturing.

For simple FET changes etc you can easy get away with a cheaper Hakko or Weller. Adjustable temperature range, and a couple of different size tips. Then you can solder almost anything.
40 to 60W is enough for most electronics.

Was gonna ask, how many watts is ideal for FETting and other related board work. I've seen 15, 30, 40W irons at radio shack for about 10$ each and if one of these is enough, I don't see why you'd need anything more expensive.