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View Full Version : MR02 MM Suspensions?


Justin
2009.10.13, 09:34 PM
I recently returned from Japan and purchased several Mini Z's along with all the genuine factory upgrades bar the oil filled rear suspension.

My question is - is there any benefits or requirement to have the rear central suspension installed when you have the Kyosho friction plate? I ask this because the included instruction manual noted that the unit operates without the requirement of the rear spring.

Personal notes and comments and suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Justin

Traveler
2009.10.13, 09:48 PM
Lucky you. I've tried the top oil shock and didn't notice any improvement over the PN DDS alone, so I don't use it. Nor does anyone I race with at my LHS.

Justin
2009.10.13, 09:54 PM
I was sitting there last night wondering whether or not the rear shock and spring even need to be in as they didnt seem to do anything, even with the hardest spring.

I guess I should be thankful that I didnt end up buying the Oil Shock as they were out of stock and it was 2 weeks before they'd have more and I was going the day after :rolleyes:

Hopefully other people may have discovered something I havent in regards to the legitimacy of having the rear spring shock.

EMU
2009.10.13, 10:14 PM
You use the rear spring to control t-plate sag/squat. When you want more fore/aft stiffness without effecting the lateral stiffness. This is especially helpful/mandatory when using the FRP t-plates...

I use a top shock on almost all of my setups. I like the way the rear end feels with it installed. I dont like much squat with my setups, and like to preload the upper spring on the DDS. When using a DDS, I dont use an oil shock, just a top spring...

Eman
2009.10.13, 11:21 PM
I've used the oil shock by itself and it does a good job of eliminating bouncing. I've never used the oil shock with a DDS. It didn't seem necessary.

byebye
2009.10.14, 06:50 AM
You use the rear spring to control t-plate sag/squat. When you want more fore/aft stiffness without effecting the lateral stiffness. This is especially helpful/mandatory when using the FRP t-plates...

I use a top shock on almost all of my setups. I like the way the rear end feels with it installed. I dont like much squat with my setups, and like to preload the upper spring on the DDS. When using a DDS, I dont use an oil shock, just a top spring...

That's when I've used them in the past. But to fix that squat too you can adjust the damper height on some motor mounts. I've since moved over to motor mounts that have adjustable damper heights.

Kris

hrdrvr
2009.10.14, 06:55 AM
Im with EMU on when to use the top spring. I dont use an oil shock though, and just use a stock top shock when its in need.

Youve got to watch raising the damper post enough to hold the rear end level, as that can add a lot of pre-load to the bottom spring. Ive found this causes rear end hoppage, as well as inconsistancy. Id just rather use the top shock, than ammend my DDS set up to adjust squat.

byebye
2009.10.14, 08:00 AM
Im with EMU on when to use the top spring. I dont use an oil shock though, and just use a stock top shock when its in need.

Youve got to watch raising the damper post enough to hold the rear end level, as that can add a lot of pre-load to the bottom spring. Ive found this causes rear end hoppage, as well as inconsistancy. Id just rather use the top shock, than ammend my DDS set up to adjust squat.

Yeah true I hope I didn't mislead the op. Good point hrdrvr. You have to adjust to the track and your driving style. In my case I have it set all the way but it seems my h plate is sagging and could use a top shock to level it out.