PDA

View Full Version : PN Regional weight question


Mike Keely
2010.05.17, 06:42 AM
I have not been to a race that I had to weigh my car. First question is on a MR03 with the normal hoop-ups how much weight will I most likely need to add? Second question is where do you guy put the weight and what do you use for weight. Just looking for any ideas so I know what most people are doing. Thanks

hrdrvr
2010.05.17, 08:43 AM
I think it matter what body you are using, and what op-ups are "normal" to you.

This weekend at the Carolina Cup race I ran a 96mm ASC 911 on an MR03. Im running a PN pod with no top shock, Kyosho shaft with 64p diff, and alu camber arms. I weighed in at 178 with no lead added.

However, my C9 would have been underweight for stock. I think I added something like 18g to get it up to the 185g mark for their LM class. I used lead tape stuck onto the bottom of the chassis under the batteries. I also wrapped the front body clip with tape, as I was trying to add a tad more front bite. My car seemed perfectly balanced, if I could have just driven it proper.....

Others were using tungsten or lead in the grooves on the bottom of the chassis.

You can pick up some cheap scales from Harbor Freight (http://www.harborfreight.com/digital-pocket-scale-93543.html) to get things really close before showing up to the track. I like to leave a little weight off, so I can tune the last bit to the scales that will be used, and to the spot on the car where I need a bit more grip.

EMU
2010.05.17, 11:55 AM
Definitely get a scale for yourself. But do remember, that not every scale is exactly the same, so it is just to get you in the ballpark. At races, you must weigh in on their scale, so check weight compared to your scale at the start of the event. My scale was a little heavier than the one at the Carolina cup, but only a few tenths.

My stock car was 164g in practice. I tried to add the weight to the chassis, rather than the body or motormount. I used wheel balancing weights, which come with 2 sizes, 4g and 2g in the same package. I attached one on the top of the chassis between the ICS ports on the MR03, also there is a little space between the batteries on the bottom of the chassis that you can tape it on, then shave it down a little so it is flush with the chassis.

Lead tape is actually a better option, since you can put a flat piece along the bottom of the body, and fill smaller areas easier.

If you are keeping parts off the chassis to reduce weight, you may want to try using them if you are light weight.

On my LM car I stuck a weight to the back of the chassis, between the motormount and the chassis, and one right in front of the DDS plate.

Going to a traveling race, with different grip and track style than what I know, I went in as light as I could with the cars, and used the weight to try to balance the grip.

One rule of thumb that I try to follow, is to keep the added mass low, and between the axles. This keeps the car from becoming less sluggish as the weight is added.

Action B
2010.05.17, 01:19 PM
Mike I have that scale from harbor freight.

Its pretty great.

You can borrow it if you need it for an event. If you get it, make sure you get yourself a 500 gram weight to calibrate it with. After so many uses it makes you recalibrate it before it will function any more.

EMU
2010.05.17, 01:21 PM
You can test calibration with a nickel. It should be 5g ;)

Action B
2010.05.17, 01:34 PM
You can test calibration with a nickel. It should be 5g ;)

After so many weighings, it will not let you weigh ANYTHING until you recalibrate it. It must be calibrated with a 500 gram weight. This happened to me and I just stacked 100 nickels on there lol. It wasn't easy to do so I recommend picking up a 500 gram weight for when that happens.

THis is not a matter of it being off or checking it with a nickel, it simply wont let you do that until you calibrate it with 500 grams. Weird I know but true.

EMU
2010.05.17, 01:38 PM
I understand what you are saying, but I just wanted to point out that you can see if it is well calibrated by using a nickel to see if it is properly calibrated. I have a few different scales. Some need 100g, 200g or 500g calibration weight...

Action B
2010.05.17, 01:46 PM
I understand what you are saying, but I just wanted to point out that you can see if it is well calibrated by using a nickel to see if it is properly calibrated. I have a few different scales. Some need 100g, 200g or 500g calibration weight...

Oh yeah then I did that too. I woudln't recommend the 100 nickels trick it was really difficult to do because you had to get them all up there in about 10 seconds and roughly at the same time or it would calibrate with half of them or something like that.

Mike Keely
2010.05.17, 09:59 PM
Where did you get the 500g weight?

EMU
2010.05.17, 10:02 PM
Most of the time you can get it at the same place you get the scale.