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ChiMiniRc
2010.05.30, 09:04 AM
I've acquired many used mini-z cars lately for our Chicago Mini-Z club (the club provides all the equipment including cars). Some cars are setup great for the RCP track and other's need a little help. I'd like to figure out what tires are on the cars we seem to like.

Is there ANY way to identify a tire outside of the packaging? Right now I'm going off of pulling the tire like a rubber band and guessing and which ones stretch more or less. This only allows me comparisons relative to others but doesn't really clear up the exact value of the tire.

In my quest to build the fleet I must have 60 pairs of good tires, I'm just trying to sort them out. I know this is unlikely but maybe there is trick out there I don't know about.

arch2b
2010.05.30, 09:56 AM
many mold the shore number into the sidewall. i only wish there was a common manner in which this could be done by all manuf's.

EMU
2010.05.30, 11:11 AM
I agree arch... Would be much easier.

Different companies have different compounds... There really is no easy way to know what tires there are. Even a trained eye will have difficulty determining the types and compounds of the tires.

I would recommend using Atomic 40d fronts if you have a large fleet. It is an easy tire to drive, and will last a really long time with consistant performance. Rear tires you may want to change more frequently, but a long lasting rear tire is the Kyosho 20d radial (even when it turns to a slick there is a lot of life left), or even the LM 20 rear. The LM 20 can only be used with bodies that have a lot of rear clearance.

ChiMiniRc
2010.05.30, 11:22 AM
I would recommend using Atomic 40d fronts if you have a large fleet. It is an easy tire to drive, and will last a really long time with consistent performance. Rear tires you may want to change more frequently, but a long lasting rear tire is the Kyosho 20d radial (even when it turns to a slick there is a lot of life left), or even the LM 20 rear. The LM 20 can only be used with bodies that have a lot of rear clearance.

Very helpful. As it stands the club has 30 cars but only 4 that I'm really happy with. I have a bit of work ahead of me but I want them all to be relatively consistent. I understand in the long run, without the exact same chassis length, wheel offsets, and bodies there will be slight differences. Some cars have no real traction (mostly stock tires that I'm looking to replace with what seems right). Others have WAY to much oversteer. I'm guessing if the rear end breaks loose under full throttle with a stock motor, then the rears are too hard.

For now we "evened" it up by having a mini race series. We ran a 15 lap race, passed the controller around, and ran another race until we all raced each car once.

Skv012a
2010.05.30, 05:25 PM
Well, one possibly tad pricy way would be to get known samples and compare the softness to those until you sort through enough to get what you needed.

arch2b
2010.05.30, 06:57 PM
good tip is to find a silver sharpie and write the shore on the inside of the tire. i did this until my pen dried out and just never got around to buying another.

also, get yourself a good tackle box of some kind to separate and sort tires and label it clearly. it will save you from headaches later.

mleemor60
2010.05.30, 07:13 PM
If you are providing both cars and tires then you can control equality. I would use Kyosho 40 fronts and Kyosho 30 rears. They wouldn't be the best but they would build driving skills. Also by using thes tires you might find a seller motivated enough to give you a substantial discount to reduce his inventory of less than front line tires. Just a thought.