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patric
2010.08.14, 12:30 AM
I have a few questions though.
What model should I look for for race track driving? I'm not looking to race right away, just practice indoors mainly.
I am also looking for long run times. I read a review that said it lasted over an hour on standard batteries, is that for real? An hour of run time would be amazing. Any decent battery suggestions?
Do these tend to have heat issues? I bought a losi micro hoping it could be my indoor car, but it just heats up like crazy.
Thanks

Action B
2010.08.14, 12:55 AM
I have a few questions though.
What model should I look for for race track driving? I'm not looking to race right away, just practice indoors mainly.
I am also looking for long run times. I read a review that said it lasted over an hour on standard batteries, is that for real? An hour of run time would be amazing. Any decent battery suggestions?
Do these tend to have heat issues? I bought a losi micro hoping it could be my indoor car, but it just heats up like crazy.
Thanks

Race Track driving for a beginner -

If buying new MR-03
If buying used MR-02 (cheaper)

I'd say 30 minutes is the run time on decent batteries with a 70 turn motor. Must use rechargeables.

Mini-Z do heat up but not like my Micro-t. They wouldn't be very good track cars if they heat up and break down during races.

For smooth surfaces you should get the MA-010

patric
2010.08.14, 03:27 PM
How long can you usually drive until it's too hot? I will mostly be driving on a pretty tight track so I could gear down from stock. Are the awd cars a lot better then 2wd? For dirt it was a huge improvement for traction, but there is plenty of traction on carpet tracks.

byebye
2010.08.15, 10:48 AM
Here is the video from the 12 hour endurance race we did. Mind you there were no breaks or yellow flags. It was all out.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Td-ZHg06D-c

Kris

EMU
2010.08.15, 12:14 PM
My rule of thumb about heat, is that you should be able to put your thumb on the motor without feeling like its burning. Warm is ok, but if you have to remove it after a couple seconds, then its too hot. Gearing, and motor choice play a big role in heat. Lower gear ratio (less accel/more top speed) will heat the motor up more. You can gear to a higher gear ratio to reduce heat a little. The happy point is typically where the motor tops out midway through the straight, otherwise the motor is always trying to push the car, and increases heat. Usually speed beyond the mid point of the straight doesnt really help anyway, since you come up on the brake/let off point quickly when up to speed.

As Kris pointed out, if you have the gearing and motor choice properly selected, you can run for hours back to back without damaging anything.

arch2b
2010.08.15, 12:17 PM
is there an english version of that video? looks like you had a good bit of interviewing.:)

byebye
2010.08.15, 05:47 PM
is there an English version of that video? looks like you had a good bit of interviewing.:)

No unfortunately. Though the interviews were in English.