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View Full Version : How Can I Provide Clearance For a Car Body So the Damper Post Can Pass Through?


Starsky5000
2011.06.23, 04:59 PM
Here is a link to what my setup looks like:

http://www.kenonhobby.com/PN-Racing-Mini-Z-MR015MR02-90-94mm-MM-Motor-Mount-Silver_p_42818.html

It's very the same setup as show in the color pics on that page and I'm using a Lamborghini Countach body. You see the damper post that holds the springs and discs in place. That gets in the way of the Countach mounting to the chassis.

How do I go about getting a perfect clearance. What tools/tricks do you guys use?

Do I drill a hole or what?

briankstan
2011.06.23, 05:47 PM
Depending on the body you might have to drill a hole in the window or back of the car, it's either that or change the rear suspension to something that has the clearance. Not all systems work with all bodies.

chad508
2011.06.23, 05:51 PM
One thing you will find in this hobby is that you have to make a lot of things fit by shaving cutting and so on. This is the one thing I love about this hobby. The more you do the better you will get at all of it

Starsky5000
2011.06.23, 06:39 PM
This is my first Mini Z ever and it was quite a learning experience. At first it drove me nuts because I was lost. I thank this forum and Kenon Hobbies for all their help.

It says on the webpage I linked that "Sports car bodies may require some clearancing."

How do you mark an exact hole on the body to get a perfect cut??

I invested alot of money over $900 getting the Mini Z MR-03 JSCC Edition,Ko Propo EX-1 UR transmitter, Lamborghini Countach body, PN Racing MM Motor Mount, damper disks, damper springs, Kyosho wheels, tires, tire tape, front bumpers, motors and lots and lots of hex head titanium screws of various lengths (machine & tapping screws) among other parts.

Starsky5000
2011.06.23, 07:41 PM
Depending on the body you might have to drill a hole in the window or back of the car, it's either that or change the rear suspension to something that has the clearance. Not all systems work with all bodies.

In this case I would have to drill a hole on top of the Countach because thats where the shock lands.

This is what I had to work with in the beginning.
http://www.kyoshoamerica.com/MR-03N-24GHz-Chassis-Set-JSCC_p_720.html

Their was NO WAY I was gonna get that low Countach body to mount on that.

So someone on this forum suggested I go with this mount from PN Racing:
http://www.kenonhobby.com/PN-Racing-Mini-Z-MR015MR02-90-94mm-MM-Motor-Mount-Silver_p_42818.html

color01
2011.06.23, 07:54 PM
How do you mark an exact hole on the body to get a perfect cut??
Sorry, I feel like I'm getting trolled with this question. You can feel when the disk damper contacts the body, right? So use that knowledge. Dab some paint on the highest point of the disk damper (typically, the top screw) and try to reinstall the body. The paint will rub off, and that's approximately where you need to cut. You will actually need to cut a little bit ahead of the mark because you also have to account for suspension travel.

blt456
2011.06.23, 08:05 PM
Just take a pencil and draw all over the top damper screw. The graphite will rub off onto the spot you need to drill. Just drill a small hole, put the body back on, and see if it's big enough.. if not, enlarge it a small bit at a time.

Do you plan on racing where you live?? You seem to have bought a lot of stuff and you are running a 90mm body and that is not a good setup for racing unless you like to see a lot of traction rolls :) Maybe if you plan on racing you should reconsider putting the 90mm stuff away and getting a "race" setup (adjustable motor mount, tires, rims, and a racing body!)

Please trust me on this. I have driven all 3 "mini" cars (90mm - vw bug, mini cooper, toyota vitz) that recently won 1-2-3 at the KOGP race in California. All 3 suffer from chattering and rolling to matter what. If you go too stiff your car just won't have enough front grip to go through corners. Too much obviously will just make your car flip. 90mm setups take wayyyyy too much time, that's *probably* why you don't see a lot of sponsored drivers in that class.

Brian - trololol :p

Starsky5000
2011.06.23, 08:15 PM
Just take a pencil and draw all over the top damper screw. The graphite will rub off onto the spot you need to drill. Just drill a small hole, put the body back on, and see if it's big enough.. if not, enlarge it a small bit at a time.

Do you plan on racing where you live?? You seem to have bought a lot of stuff and you are running a 90mm body and that is not a good setup for racing unless you like to see a lot of traction rolls :) Maybe if you plan on racing you should reconsider putting the 90mm stuff away and getting a "race" setup (adjustable motor mount, tires, rims, and a racing body!)

Brian - trololol :p

Yes one day I plan on racing if I can find a track in Bronx, New York. Can you recommend me a good setup for racing including a body? Thanx.

blt456
2011.06.23, 08:28 PM
If I were to buy parts, I would buy these..

1. pn racing 53t limited slip spur gear (acts like a locked diff when accelerating, giving more rear traction and creates a bit of understeer). I run 53t in stock and mod. this is just my own preference.

http://www.kenonhobby.com/PN-Racing-Mini-Z-2WD-Machine-Cut-Delrin-Limited-Slip-64P-Spur-Gear-53T_p_42587.html

2. pn 64 pitch pinions..depends on motor

3. pn 80t motor so you can learn how to drive without too much power :p

http://www.kenonhobby.com/PN-Racing-Mini-Z-PNWC-Bushing-Motor-80-Turn_p_43051.html

4. pn racing lightweight ball differential - comes with the best parts and all 64p pinions so you can test what works best for you (replace spur gear on diff with the 53t limited slip)

5. pn racing v3 mount - easy motor access, comes with longer damper arm (can upgrade when going to a side shock setup) and very user friendly.

http://www.kenonhobby.com/PN-Racing-Mini-Z-MR0203-94-98mm-V3-LCG-Motor-Mount-Blue_p_42909.html

6. damper plate - you already have disks and springs, and the post is included with the motor mount above.

http://www.kenonhobby.com/PN-Racing-MR02-V2-Carbon-Graphite-Disk-Damper-Plate-Set_p_43233.html


7. lexus sc430 body (works great for stock and mod and at every track I go to)

http://www.kenonhobby.com/Kyosho-Mini-Z-MR02RM-Lexus-SC430-GT500-White-Body-Set_p_41668.html

8. bearings

http://www.kenonhobby.com/PN-Racing-Mini-Z-MR015-MR02-Ball-Bearing-Set-7pcs_p_42810.html

9. tires and wheels. I use +1 in the front and rear. Makes the lexus soooooo stable. You can even go +2 offset in the rear. Get tires at your track so you know which ones will work (ask around)

10. reflex racing front suspension

http://www.reflexracing.net/proddetail.asp?prod=RX115CP

11. mr02 front springs (use with reflex front suspension)

http://www.kenonhobby.com/PN-Racing-Mini-Z-MR01502-Low-Down-Front-Spring-Set-5-pairs_p_42815.html

I have used these parts with great success and just sharing my setup.

I think PN Racing provides all of the parts one needs to get a good basic setup. You can get ti screws later but other companies have these same parts but don't include things such as light weight diff shafts, 10 cermaic diff balls and delrin adjuster nuts (no threadlock required!)

I rarely have any troubles with PN Racing parts and they last a long time. These parts may seem like a lot to invest into, but the reality is you won't need to buy many other parts after buying items likes these ( replacement parts that are usually 5 dollars or under)

greenepa76
2011.06.24, 12:06 PM
Starsky,

I run two 90mm setups that seems to work well on med grip RCP and carpet. One is nearly box stock using a narrow setup for a 355 challenge body. I've tried many settings on this first car (Ferrari 355) that don't require a lot of money to be dumped into the this class for entry level baseline settings.

Ferrari 355 challenge

Front:
-1 degree camber knuckles
-Black front Kyosho MR03 kit springs or play with what you like to get the response you want.
-1 mm spacer stacked under the knuckles.
-0 offset wheels
-Kyosho 40 degree radial front tires
This setup has the best response settings on our home RCP track at work with minimal chatter and very predictable.

Rear:
-RM setting with a broken carbon t-plate used to shim the plastic motor pod to lower rear ride height since the plastic doesn't allow for axle height spacer adjustability.
-PN #4 carbon t-plate with O rings added to stock plastic top shock front and rear pivots to act as a "cheap" disk damper. Stock top damper spring. Modified o-ring to fit inside of damper shaft to provide minimal damping and eliminate the "springiness" that the stock plastic shock has. I don't run a damper plate on this car and the rear doesn't chatter.
-A little silicone grease in the stock gear diff to slow down the diff action. I used 15k. This will help provide a little push to the front end under power so the rear end won't swing around on you as you exit.
-0 offset Kyosho wheels also
-Kyosho 20 degree slick wide tires
-stock Kyosho motor with kit provided 8 tooth pinion

This makes the car very drivable using the narrow front end configuration and it never has traction rolled on me. Make sure your dual rate settings aren't cranked up either because this setup has a lot of steering. My driving style also caters to throttle steering. If you want more rear grip, use the Kyosho 20 degree radials.
The front Knuckles are the most expensive items, but provide the best solution for the chatters that the narrow front encounters.


Porsche 911 GT1
Front:
-Stock plastic front knuckles with 1.5 shim stack underneath and 0.2 PN alum shim on top of knuckle.
-Kyosho MR03 aluminum front arms with modified spring perch button to minimize preload. These are delrin I believe and I cut the shoulder to allow the springs to sit higher up to reduce preload since the springs are long.
-PN racing aluminum tower bar with 0.2 mm shims underneath.
-PN racing orange super soft spring set. This springs aren't as soft with the Kyosho alum arms as they would normally be with the plastic front arms, but provide the best all around balance of response and grip for my driving style.
The Kyosho super soft shortened spring set springs are too soft for these arms, but are the ones that are recommended. The front end wallows around and feels very mushy with this recommended spring set.
-1 degree offset front wheels with Kyosho 30 deg radial tires
-Kyosho +2 toe-in bar

Rear:
-Kyosho hard carbon RM t-plate
-PN racing RM motor mount pod
-Kyosho RM rear disc damper with carbon lower damper disc covered with Kyosho teflon tape and blue PN damper disc spring. The top disc is a PN plastic damper plate with green PN spring. I ended up using a reflex racing damper post instead of stock Kyosho, which has too much slop.
-PN 70t motor with 52/14 gearing
-PN ultralight diff setup with ceramic balls.
-Grooved Kyosho 20 degree slicks

This setup has also never traction rolled on me with lots of steering and zero chatter, but the rear end does swing a bit due to the heavy rear end of the GT1 body. I use grooved Kyosho slicks on the rear for more side bite, but I'm sure radials will provide the most traction, but I haven't tried them. I like to toss the rear ends of my cars with these 90mm setups. The cars are a little twitchier compared to the other classes, but you'll get used to it. :) Just dial down the steering dual rates on your TX as mentioned before.

The shorter cars seems to behave better with harder suspensions and the longer wheelbase cars drive better with super soft suspension settings. I have 5 MR03 with all levels of mods that are driven daily with rotation between work RCP track and Kyosho carpet track on the weekends.

Starsky5000
2011.06.24, 03:24 PM
I called Kyosho America today and I told him that I'm running a Lamborghini Countach LP500S on Mini Z MR-03 JSCC Edition and the Oil Filled Rear Shock & carbon fiber friction shock set gets in the way. He replied with certain bodies you just have to leave them out.

greenepa76
2011.06.24, 03:57 PM
It's true. Don't always need a top shock. Use a harder carbon t-plate or cut a hole in the body if you must use one, but the friction damper should still work.

EMU
2011.06.24, 07:32 PM
This is one flaw in the PN 90mm mount, it has a high damper position, which makes it difficult to use with lower bodies due to clearance issues.

There are a few things you can do to try to lower the footprint... Reverse the damper post so that the flange is on the top, which allows you to lower the damper plate a millimeter or so and not use a top screw in the damper post, which increases clearance more. I dont know how much clearance you need to make with the Countach body, but it will help at least...

Since the damper plate is attached to the mount, and moves as the pod moves, you need more clearance than a more traditional setup with the damper plate attached to the chassis.

Other options are to re-position the side body clips a little lower to raise the rear of the body slightly so less shaving is required.