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thestug
2011.08.16, 02:19 PM
I have read online recently about 1/10 scale drift cars using diff gears in the rear that are geared to spin faster than the front, for more of a countersteer type of drifting. I would like o try this on a mini-z? Do they make different gears ratios for the Kyosho ball diffs and one-way?

I currently am running kyosho ball diffs with ceramic balls front and rear. Is this acceptablefor drifting or is there a better diff set up? Perhaps a one-way in the front?

Also, a question on spools or locked diffs. I thought about making one out of an old broken stock diff. Does this work well or would you recommend getting a solid aluminum one?

herman
2011.08.17, 04:38 AM
the only thing i got my car to drift was... drift tires...
i kept mine pretty stock, then added bearings... and that's it... :D
haven't tried all the other stuff you mentioned yet...

try out the drift tires first, then if you think you need any other stuff, you can try it out... hope this helps... :D

Mania
2011.08.17, 06:23 AM
You don't even need drift tires; just use the ones that come with Autoscales.

kryten
2011.08.17, 08:27 AM
Personally i wouldn't use a spool/one way diff. Just set your front ball diff to about 90% locked,and have the rear loose. That and drift tyres and you're good to go. :)

Bodom
2011.08.17, 08:55 AM
It might be useful to read this (http://mini-zracer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=35780) thread if you haven't already.

thestug
2011.08.18, 11:22 AM
I know have have it drifting just fine right nowe, but I am looking for something more challenging. I heard that it is more of a challenge to have the rear diff geared to spin faster than the front to make it handle more like a RWD car instead of an AWD. I was just wondering If the make different diffs or diff gears to create this oversteer type of set-up.

thestug
2011.08.18, 11:35 AM
I think I might have to try out a Kyosho One-way, but where do the sell different #'d T gears for the Kyosho one-way or ball diff.

Bodom
2011.08.19, 01:41 AM
I think I might have to try out a Kyosho One-way, but where do the sell different #'d T gears for the Kyosho one-way or ball diff.

I think there isn't different toothed gears for the Kyosho ball diffs.
Here (http://www.egrracing.com/shop/awd-ball-diff-gear-option-gear-26-t-p-97.html) it is for the Atomic diffs. There are for the 3Racing diffs too. But I haven't seen such for the Kyosho diffs.

ub0211042
2011.08.19, 10:15 AM
from the beginning i've used lock diff rear and front one way...here's my drift video :) it on carpet...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4AK7Dgy3A90

to make the rear more stable, increase the toe...in the vid im using 4 degree

thestug
2011.08.19, 11:46 PM
Good video, does ATM make a one-way that has different spur gears available?

color01
2011.08.20, 03:58 AM
Yes they do, and it's actually pretty good. I used to use one for my AWD drifting.

http://tinyrc.com/forums/blog.php?b=71

tastetickles
2011.08.24, 05:57 AM
Hi I'm new here but I think I can share my experience on RC drifting especially countersteer setup.

I have both the Mini Z AWD and my 1/10 scale Im currently running the Yokomo DRB Hyper SSG. Both cars are easily dritable without any changes out of the box but to make the MA010 CS setup would be difficult.

The main thing to do in CS setup is to either underdrive the front or overdrive the rear or a combination of both as long as you make the rear wheels rotate more than the front it will do. The purpose is to make the rear end loose all the time so u can keep countersteering so it looks more realistic. I'm running a 2.0 overdrive on my DRB, so rear wheel spins twice the front.

I'm not sure how you could achieve this ratio but u might be able to achieve slight rear overdrive with some gear changes but hard due to space limitation on mini z.

After that is done, you will encounter 2 problems. One you lose a lot of acceleration due to lower traction and secondly you will have too much steering grip.

This can be tuned out using tires choice (easily done on mini-z since they are not being controlled, 1/10 has to use the same tires in competition most of the time so all 4 must be the same). Another alternative is to run massive camber up front, this sorta contradicts how you setup your car normally because 1/10 rc drifters use high camber (commonly 8 to 10 degress camber or more) to reduce contact patch of hard plastic tires (not recommended to run soft high grip tires because the big difference in tire rotation ratio cause severe stress to the drivetrain.

As for the diff, a front one way and a rear solid axle is very common. The one way is mainly there for the e-brake effect, its good for making fast tight corner transition but u lose the ability to track straight.

Sorry for wall of text.

thestug
2011.08.24, 02:49 PM
Hi I'm new here but I think I can share my experience on RC drifting especially countersteer setup.

I have both the Mini Z AWD and my 1/10 scale Im currently running the Yokomo DRB Hyper SSG. Both cars are easily dritable without any changes out of the box but to make the MA010 CS setup would be difficult.

The main thing to do in CS setup is to either underdrive the front or overdrive the rear or a combination of both as long as you make the rear wheels rotate more than the front it will do. The purpose is to make the rear end loose all the time so u can keep countersteering so it looks more realistic. I'm running a 2.0 overdrive on my DRB, so rear wheel spins twice the front.

I'm not sure how you could achieve this ratio but u might be able to achieve slight rear overdrive with some gear changes but hard due to space limitation on mini z.

After that is done, you will encounter 2 problems. One you lose a lot of acceleration due to lower traction and secondly you will have too much steering grip.

This can be tuned out using tires choice (easily done on mini-z since they are not being controlled, 1/10 has to use the same tires in competition most of the time so all 4 must be the same). Another alternative is to run massive camber up front, this sorta contradicts how you setup your car normally because 1/10 rc drifters use high camber (commonly 8 to 10 degress camber or more) to reduce contact patch of hard plastic tires (not recommended to run soft high grip tires because the big difference in tire rotation ratio cause severe stress to the drivetrain.

As for the diff, a front one way and a rear solid axle is very common. The one way is mainly there for the e-brake effect, its good for making fast tight corner transition but u lose the ability to track straight.

Sorry for wall of text.

Thanks, this is the info I was looking for, but I'm still a bit confused about the front grip and camber bit. As far as I know and have tested camber has very little effect on small scales like mini-z's. I'm might try out a one-way and lock a stock gear diff for the rear. I don't really understand why they charge so much for solid axles.

tastetickles
2011.08.25, 03:29 AM
On 1/10 scale drift car, one of the most popular tires to use is the HPI T-Drift, these tires are really hard and low grip (although the T-drift is one of the grippier of drift slicks) and they do not conform to the surface they ride on at all.
When the rear end is being overdriven the tires spins really fast and lose traction really easy and with a front one way the slightest uneven-ness of the ground or a slight front toe out on one side will cause the car to swing one direction so the front steering grip will appear to be very high. Thats one of the reason why many CS drifters run high camber in front so the tires only touch the ground on the inner edge to reduce front grip.

This is not a big problem when the car is already in a drift but CS setup is a tad harder like most claimed because you cannot change ur drift lines like on a 50:50 power distributed car when you make a boo boo.

On my 1/10, I had to use the softest and grippiest setting for the rear end and the hardest settings for the front just to keep the car managable (basically trying to make the car understeer when its in a drift) while using the same tires on all 4 corners. But I think you shouldnt have to worry about the camber stuff because running different grip tires or narrower rims is common on miniz, that alone would most likely solve the front grip problem.

You can also start with slight overdriven rear and progress more later on, I had to go for the extreme overdriven because trying out different ratio would cost too much on the DRB.

thestug
2011.08.25, 11:07 AM
On 1/10 scale drift car, one of the most popular tires to use is the HPI T-Drift, these tires are really hard and low grip (although the T-drift is one of the grippier of drift slicks) and they do not conform to the surface they ride on at all.
When the rear end is being overdriven the tires spins really fast and lose traction really easy and with a front one way the slightest uneven-ness of the ground or a slight front toe out on one side will cause the car to swing one direction so the front steering grip will appear to be very high. Thats one of the reason why many CS drifters run high camber in front so the tires only touch the ground on the inner edge to reduce front grip.

This is not a big problem when the car is already in a drift but CS setup is a tad harder like most claimed because you cannot change ur drift lines like on a 50:50 power distributed car when you make a boo boo.

On my 1/10, I had to use the softest and grippiest setting for the rear end and the hardest settings for the front just to keep the car managable (basically trying to make the car understeer when its in a drift) while using the same tires on all 4 corners. But I think you shouldnt have to worry about the camber stuff because running different grip tires or narrower rims is common on miniz, that alone would most likely solve the front grip problem.

You can also start with slight overdriven rear and progress more later on, I had to go for the extreme overdriven because trying out different ratio would cost too much on the DRB.

Thanks for clarifying on the grip. I usually run wide drift tires in the rear and narrows up front, so I dont think there will be any major problems. I also don't think there are that many different gear ratios to choose from. The most CS I might be able to achive is about 2T smaller on the front diff. Or maybe 4T difference between front and rear if I find a way to run a smaller gear in back.

What are your thoughts on breaking in drift tires? Is it necessary? If it is necessary, what surface works well?

tastetickles
2011.08.26, 05:28 AM
I didnt bother too much with breaking in the tires other than doing figure 8 and rotating the tires and repeat on ceramic tiles (higher grip than smooth concrete) but making sure to glue those on rims.

I heat cycle the tires and sometimes use SWEEP tire sauce or WD-40 to give them more grip.

color01
2011.08.26, 07:37 PM
A one-tooth difference on the MA010 is already a lot. :eek: I drove Dr. Kustom's CS-MA010 and it was a pretty hairy experience. :eek:

thestug
2011.10.06, 04:12 PM
A one-tooth difference on the MA010 is already a lot. :eek: I drove Dr. Kustom's CS-MA010 and it was a pretty hairy experience. :eek:

So, if I want to lock a stock rear diff for the rear and get an undergeared front one way from atomic. How many teeth does the diff need in the front. I would think it would be the 28t. Right?

syafiq
2011.10.09, 12:41 PM
So, if I want to lock a stock rear diff for the rear and get an undergeared front one way from atomic. How many teeth does the diff need in the front. I would think it would be the 28t. Right?

28t at the front and 26t at the back. dont worry the change is very small only 8% faster than the front tyre. if you play on the carpet you need harder spring at the back and medium spring at the front.

thestug
2011.10.09, 04:24 PM
28t at the front and 26t at the back. dont worry the change is very small only 8% faster than the front tyre. if you play on the carpet you need harder spring at the back and medium spring at the front.

I thought the stock gear diffs were 27t. So if I put a locked stock diff in the rear and a 28t on my ATM ball diff It would be about 4% rear overdrive?

Skv012a
2011.10.09, 07:36 PM
Also try simply running narrow front, but wide rears. Helps achieve that squirrely RWD feel as well.

syafiq
2011.10.10, 07:44 AM
I thought the stock gear diffs were 27t. So if I put a locked stock diff in the rear and a 28t on my ATM ball diff It would be about 4% rear overdrive?

yup 4%. but seriously 4% cs? that is really small compare to those who play 1/10 which use more than 50% cs.

thestug
2011.10.11, 10:21 PM
yup 4%. but seriously 4% cs? that is really small compare to those who play 1/10 which use more than 50% cs.

True, but the scale it so small. Any adjustment is amplified on a smaller scale. I think I am going to try for 8% because that is the max without some more extreme modification. I have also heard about cutting part of the center gear off and carefully putting a larger pinion gear, usually about 10t instead of 8. I think the 28t in front and 26 rear will be enough CS. I just want it to have some CS to make it look more like a RWD drifter. It just doesn't seem right to have a RWD body not counter-steering.

syafiq
2011.10.20, 10:20 AM
i always had problem on the S turn drift. my miniz either oversteer and spin out or it wont drift at all :mad:. does anyone knows how to improve this?

in my head the solution is to improve steering angle but that just impossible on miniz :p

color01
2011.10.20, 03:40 PM
Yeah, the method is called "stop using such ridiculous overdrive percentages." :p CS-drifting is inherently unstable and requires much more momentum and/or skill to keep the car in line. I do see a lot of very soft suspension setups now that work very well though. Soft springs, soft damping, rounded tire edges let the car glide over bumps and irregularities.



If you want a purer RWD experience I would recommend a front grease diff or slipper diff over a CS-geared setup. The drivetrain is not overgeared, so you don't lose straight-line stability, but you shift your power bias to the rear and so it gives the same effect as CS-gearing mid-corner.

...And then there's actual RWD drifting, which I'm working on... :rolleyes:

thestug
2011.10.20, 07:06 PM
Yeah, the method is called "stop using such ridiculous overdrive percentages." :p CS-drifting is inherently unstable and requires much more momentum and/or skill to keep the car in line. I do see a lot of very soft suspension setups now that work very well though. Soft springs, soft damping, rounded tire edges let the car glide over bumps and irregularities.



If you want a purer RWD experience I would recommend a front grease diff or slipper diff over a CS-geared setup. The drivetrain is not overgeared, so you don't lose straight-line stability, but you shift your power bias to the rear and so it gives the same effect as CS-gearing mid-corner.

...And then there's actual RWD drifting, which I'm working on... :rolleyes:

What is a grease diff or slipper diff. Do you mean a gear diff packed with grease and a ball diff?

color01
2011.10.20, 07:32 PM
A grease diff is a sealed gear diff that has NO spider gears, and instead is filled up with super-thick grease. If you go too heavy (industrial lithium grease) you'll lock up the front axle into a spool, but if you use something reasonable (Kyosho 15000, for example) you'll see that there's power transfer, but it's reduced and your power bias will be pleasantly rear-biased.

A slipper diff is a ball diff with the balls removed, and instead you put in two sheets of greased paper cut to the same size as the pressure plates. That way, when you tighten up the diff, it will lock, but if you loosen it, it'll slip a little bit, once again allowing you take power from the front and send it to the rear.

Both of these methods I enjoy using infinitely more than rear axle overdrive.

thestug
2011.10.20, 08:52 PM
A grease diff is a sealed gear diff that has NO spider gears, and instead is filled up with super-thick grease. If you go too heavy (industrial lithium grease) you'll lock up the front axle into a spool, but if you use something reasonable (Kyosho 15000, for example) you'll see that there's power transfer, but it's reduced and your power bias will be pleasantly rear-biased.

A slipper diff is a ball diff with the balls removed, and instead you put in two sheets of greased paper cut to the same size as the pressure plates. That way, when you tighten up the diff, it will lock, but if you loosen it, it'll slip a little bit, once again allowing you take power from the front and send it to the rear.

Both of these methods I enjoy using infinitely more than rear axle overdrive.

Where do I get greased paper? I have never heard of it. It it something you can buy at a hardware store?

syafiq
2011.10.20, 09:46 PM
A grease diff is a sealed gear diff that has NO spider gears, and instead is filled up with super-thick grease. If you go too heavy (industrial lithium grease) you'll lock up the front axle into a spool, but if you use something reasonable (Kyosho 15000, for example) you'll see that there's power transfer, but it's reduced and your power bias will be pleasantly rear-biased.

A slipper diff is a ball diff with the balls removed, and instead you put in two sheets of greased paper cut to the same size as the pressure plates. That way, when you tighten up the diff, it will lock, but if you loosen it, it'll slip a little bit, once again allowing you take power from the front and send it to the rear.

Both of these methods I enjoy using infinitely more than rear axle overdrive.

does this method sacrifice the drift angle? because i dont care much about going straight i want my miniz to do sideway only.

color01
2011.10.20, 11:27 PM
stug -- nothing special, I literally mean that you cut two paper discs the same size as the pressure plates, and then apply diff grease (ball diff grease) to both sides of the paper before sandwiching them into the ball diff. The order goes

[diff hub][pressure plate][greased paper][spur][greased paper][pressure plate][diff hub]

Hope that helps. :)

Syafiq -- drift angle is described by how much grip you have vs. the speed and radius of your corner. You can drive a stock AWD car to a perfect 90-degree angle or more all day long, the drivetrain configuration doesn't matter.

As far as the diff setup and straight-line stability goes, let's just say it comes in handy. ;) If there's a long straight before a fast sweeper I'm going to use it to build speed, rather than drift on the straight. For my purposes, I refuse to live with a CS-geared car, which is why I have my grease/slipper diffs.

syafiq
2011.10.21, 01:12 AM
As far as the diff setup and straight-line stability goes, let's just say it comes in handy. ;) If there's a long straight before a fast sweeper I'm going to use it to build speed, rather than drift on the straight. For my purposes, I refuse to live with a CS-geared car, which is why I have my grease/slipper diffs.

that the problem my track doesnt have any straight line, all fill with corners. last time i use w/o cs it wont give me a consistent angle.

Deca
2011.10.21, 03:11 AM
I never messed with CS on mini-zs because it just doesn't seem like it would work that well on such small scale and I don't want to give up the ability to drive straight when I want to.

Honestly if you want your car to drift well all you have to do is lock the rear end, put on drift tires, and mess with your tx profile a bit. I'd definitely suggest some ballast in the front of the car as well. MA010s come stock with a little bit of toe in on the rear. I mainly put camber on my front wheels for looks, it makes a slight difference but isn't a necessary modification. One-Way diff in front is unnecessary as well, it's just nice to have to open up more options.

As far as a locked differential, just do what I did and put some sticky tack or something similar into your rear diff....actually I think I replaced that with some gauze in mine to make it easier to remove if I ever want to. It's a lot easier to effectively lock the stock diff than you may expect, and unless you use glue it's likely going to be completely reversible.

Nothing you do to your setup is going to straight up make your car drift better, it all boils down to practicing a lot, sorting out that tx profile, and getting comfortable drifting. No matter how well your setup works out in theory and how much time you put into your setup, someone who spent the time just driving and practicing will likely show you up in even a stock chassis. One thing to remember in drifting with any scale, right on up to real cars, is that past a certain basic point the tuning is not specifically making the car perform any "better." It's all about catering the car to the driver and making it behave in a manner that is predictable to the driver and in alignment with their own driving style.

One sad truth here is that a Mini Z is never going to drift like a 1/10, and is always going to require a bit more effort to get around the track sideways. It's still fun but you have to come to terms with the limitations of the scale, the short wheelbase and lower mass is not conducive to the nice flowing drifts you can get from a bigger car. Don't take this the wrong way, I'm all about experimenting with CS setups and all sorts of stuff like that (definitely let us know how that goes if you experiment with it! I'm interested to hear and see videos, might inspire me to try as well), I just don't want you to think that the car is going to become extremely easy to drift if you find some magic setup.

I'm really out of practice myself, our Z club was on hiatus for several months and just now got back into having regular meets. You've motivated me to shift some focus back to my drifting. Good luck and stay sideways! :)

syafiq
2011.10.21, 05:53 AM
mini z drift stuff

actually i dont need to lock the rear diff because it solid axle. so in the end is down to the driver.
but how about use a similar setup from takara tomy. because my next attempt is to connect both left and right of my one way so it wont move independently but in the same pace. also i heard that takara tomy does use cs gear.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VbzilS5tiyY&feature=player_detailpage

Deca
2011.10.21, 10:48 AM
actually i dont need to lock the rear diff because it solid axle. so in the end is down to the driver.
but how about use a similar setup from takara tomy. because my next attempt is to connect both left and right of my one way so it wont move independently but in the same pace. also i heard that takara tomy does use cs gear.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VbzilS5tiyY&feature=player_detailpage

Well yeah that's what I mean, you just need the rear end to be solid one way or another. No difference between a solid axle and a locked diff (though a diff would have more rotating mass...that might make some slight difference in throttle off response). Locking the rear allows you to let off the throttle without getting nasty snap oversteer and just makes the car much more stable sideways.

I forgot about the takara tomy drift package thingies! I almost bought one a while back, I'd like to try one out. Curious now if they really do use CS settings. I wonder what the easiest/cheapest way would be to experiment with CS on my mini-z...it is definitely something I've always wanted to try.

color01
2011.10.21, 04:57 PM
I suspect the Tomica's are NOT using CS gearing, in all the videos you see them sliding without significant opposite lock.

Cheapest working CS setup for MA-010 is to buy an Atomic solid axle and a 26t ring gear and replace the rear diff. I got a one-way instead and put it in the front though, the ability of a one-way car to slide out without throttle is super important to me.

Deca
2011.10.21, 05:51 PM
I suspect the Tomica's are NOT using CS gearing, in all the videos you see them sliding without significant opposite lock.

Cheapest working CS setup for MA-010 is to buy an Atomic solid axle and a 26t ring gear and replace the rear diff. I got a one-way instead and put it in the front though, the ability of a one-way car to slide out without throttle is super important to me.

I have the Atomic 1-way in the front of my car, what gear would I need on there to CS? I don't have the car handy so I can't check what the stock tooth count is...for some reason I thought they were all 26? Sounds like I'm wrong though lol

I'd definitely like to grab a different gear for it at our next race and try it out.

color01
2011.10.21, 08:09 PM
Grab a 28t ring gear for the one-way to get CS gearing -- the stock diffs are 27t. :)

In unrelated news, an MR03 + F430 + rear spoiler = pretty good RWD drifting! If you can find the right tires it's about 90% predictable. Time to lay down the cones and start practicing the reverse-entry RWD drift... :cool:

thestug
2011.10.21, 08:46 PM
Grab a 28t ring gear for the one-way to get CS gearing -- the stock diffs are 27t. :)

In unrelated news, an MR03 + F430 + rear spoiler = pretty good RWD drifting! If you can find the right tires it's about 90% predictable. Time to lay down the cones and start practicing the reverse-entry RWD drift... :cool:

Sweet! RWD drifting! A quick question though. Would a car with a front one way and CS gearing be able to drive straight? It seems like the front one way would be spinning freely until the corner, right? Maybe I have this backwards. Could some one explain how a one way works?

color01
2011.10.21, 09:17 PM
The front one-way in that setup would simply not drive the front wheels IF the rears have traction, because the underdriven front axle "sees" that the front wheels are going faster than it. All four wheels are allowed to turn at the same speed so yes, in theory, it can work. However, with drift tires, when do the rear wheels really have traction? :p So in practice a front one-way plus CS gearing is just too unstable to be used competitively.

thestug
2011.10.25, 03:48 PM
The front one-way in that setup would simply not drive the front wheels IF the rears have traction, because the underdriven front axle "sees" that the front wheels are going faster than it. All four wheels are allowed to turn at the same speed so yes, in theory, it can work. However, with drift tires, when do the rear wheels really have traction? :p So in practice a front one-way plus CS gearing is just too unstable to be used competitively.

Would a locked rear diff and a front grease diff work well? I think I have some extra damping grease I could use. Color01, You should definitely post a video of the Mr-03 drifting.

color01
2011.10.25, 10:43 PM
Yup, that's my favorite AWD config.

As for RWD drifting, it'll have to wait till I am less screwed by school, haha. I'd like to make my first video in a long time well-edited. :)

Deca
2011.10.26, 10:37 AM
Ordered the gear for my one-way, going to pick it up at the race this weekend and see how it works out. Kind of excited to experiment with a CS drift setup finally, hoping I enjoy it!

Deca
2011.10.30, 10:08 PM
Just as a heads up to everyone in this thread, STOCK MA010 DIFFS ARE 28T

THANKS GUYS

thestug
2011.11.30, 05:31 PM
I just made a grease diff and a locked rear diff. It works great, until the front diff loses some of its grease. The grease seems to be coming out of the three holes on the left side of the diff. After the diff leaks out it handles like a RWD car. I use RSD white damping grease that I got from Reflex. It this grease too thin or do I need to plug the holes??? I might try putting my ball diff back in the front. Any help will be much appreciated, because it is a pain to repack the front diff after about 20min of driving.

thestug
2011.12.01, 03:44 PM
anyone????

Skv012a
2011.12.01, 04:24 PM
Well, plugging holes would be the obvious solution to leaking. Also try to seal it; maybe cut some kinda thin rubber O ring and put it in when you screw the diff together.

If I understand this grease diff correctly, why not just run a loose ball diff instead?

color01
2011.12.01, 11:29 PM
So, the AWD gear diff has three holes in the back plate which is usually where all the grease escapes from; there's no need for those holes so just glue them shut. Afterwards you should not have to use a thicker grease.

A grease diff is better than a loose ball diff for drifting IMO because a loose ball diff still grips a little bit before letting go, leading to a slight unpredictability. A grease diff you know will slip all the time, and so in my experience it feels more pleasant to drive. It may not be for everyone, but that is why it's called an option part. :)

thestug
2011.12.02, 01:46 PM
So, the AWD gear diff has three holes in the back plate which is usually where all the grease escapes from; there's no need for those holes so just glue them shut. Afterwards you should not have to use a thicker grease.

A grease diff is better than a loose ball diff for drifting IMO because a loose ball diff still grips a little bit before letting go, leading to a slight unpredictability. A grease diff you know will slip all the time, and so in my experience it feels more pleasant to drive. It may not be for everyone, but that is why it's called an option part. :)

So would a tiny dab of regular CA glue in the holes fix it? I love the grease diff when it works, so I will have to try this. I like the grease diff because it slips anytime you are accelerating even slightly hard. This leads to the rear tires spinning faster than the front very much like a CS modified car. I was actually able to do some circle drifting with a ton of opposite lock. :D:cool: However I do recommend running at least 94mm wheelbase, because it allows a little more time to realize that the back end is sliding out and correct it. Loose ball diffs would wear out quickly allowing it to slip this much. grease diffs are also much smoother than my Kyosho ball diffs with ceramic balls and sanded diff plates, which should the best diff you can buy if money is not a problem. I find it ironic that a $60 diff can't out perform the stock diff with a little bit of modifying.

Skv012a
2011.12.02, 03:44 PM
I find it ironic that a $60 diff can't out perform the stock diff with a little bit of modifying.

Not in actual racing...

There are also cheap diffs like 3racing, those could be good lab rats. I had no idea you were trying this with a Kyo ball diff....

thestug
2011.12.02, 04:15 PM
Not in actual racing...

There are also cheap diffs like 3racing, those could be good lab rats. I had no idea you were trying this with a Kyo ball diff....

Yeah, in actual racing I would use my ball diffs. The kyosho diffs are great, but I think drifting is somewhere the grease diff dominates.