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View Full Version : 1.5V - 40V/ 5A adjustable regulated Linear Power supply Transform Board


arch2b
2013.08.16, 09:52 PM
i finally got this in the mail from the slow boat from china. just opened it up and took some pictures. i haven't even plugged it in yet.

DESCRIPTION
BRAND NEW
Quantity as title

This kit provides a variable output power supply ranging from 1.5 to 40 V @ 5 A. It uses Low Dropout Positive Regulator LM1084-ADJ in TO220 package for delivering variable output voltage.

Input - 110-240 VAC
Output - variable output from 1.5 ~ 40 V @5 A Regulated low ripple DC voltage
Heatsink for regulator IC
On board bridge rectifier to convert AC to DC

Zener trimmed band gap reference, current limiting and thermal shutdown (provided by IC feature)
Power Battery Terminal (PBT) for easy input and output connection
Onboard PCB mounted Potentiometer (POT) for varying the output voltage
Filter capacitors for low ripple DC output
Four mounting holes of 3.2 mm each
PCB dimensions 63 mm x 112 mm

provided this thing works, i need to figure out where the pot is to adjust the voltage and then use my multimeter to somehow label it so i can easily adjust in the future without having to dig out my multimeter each time. if it all works out, i then need to model a case and see what that costs from shapeways to print. i wonder if i can include a small pc fan in the case design and power from the board as well.

arch2b
2013.08.16, 09:57 PM
HERE (http://mini-zracer.com/mini-zgallery/showgallery.php?cat=1449&ppuser=1001) are the pictures.

here are the clearly labeled DC out's
http://mini-zracer.com/mini-zgallery/data/1449/medium/photo_2_2_.JPG

not sure what these do?
http://mini-zracer.com/mini-zgallery/data/1449/medium/photo_3_1_.JPG

the blue component next to the DC out's looks like it has a phillips tuner on the top corner
http://mini-zracer.com/mini-zgallery/data/1449/medium/photo_36.JPG

looks like it has a power ON led socket that isn't being used. would be nice to fix that.
http://mini-zracer.com/mini-zgallery/data/1449/medium/photo_4_1_.JPG

looks like this is a component board from some Muse device judging by the PCB label
http://mini-zracer.com/mini-zgallery/data/1449/medium/photo_1_2_.JPG

arch2b
2013.08.18, 01:28 PM
ok so far i've been able to do the following, plug in the board and use a multimeter to see whats coming out.

short answer, nothing. maybe one of these components is an off/off? anyone able to understand how this board works by looking at the parts?

TheSteve
2013.08.18, 02:38 PM
After a quick look this is what I would suggest:

You need to short CN5 to turn it on.

Turning the tiny screw on VR1(blue box) should adjust the output voltage.

Output can be taken from the black jack or CN2.

It appears to run from 110 or 220, this is controlled by a switch normally installed at CN4. I am thinking its probably shorted for 110, but that is just a guess.

Remember to disconnect the AC power source before messing with it! Chances are CN5 and/or CN4 have AC on them!!!!!!

NoBrainer
2013.08.18, 04:05 PM
Agree with TheSteve. Short CN5 and you probably have something out.

D1-D4 is to make AC into DC....

arch2b
2013.08.18, 05:24 PM
sounds reasonable, so it's not the finished product i was hoping. anyone willing to complete the board? i don't mind soldering but not really keen on electrical engineering to understand PCB schematics. i can follow directions well though:)

Jshwaa
2015.01.27, 04:28 PM
If you want a cheap and very powerful power supply, you can purchase a PC power supply from ebay. They put out great power for very little cost, and already have a case with a cooling fan and power switch. All you need to do is hack the 24 pin ATX cable and connect the 'green' wire to any of the 'black' wires to turn on the supply and output power. For $39.99 you can have 850W with fixed +12V, -12V, 5V, and 3.3V outputs.

arch2b
2015.01.27, 04:54 PM
yep, already have one of these. Looking for adjust ability in voltage output though. this seems to be at the high end (12-13+v) on RC power supplies or on very expensive bench lab power supplies. there are much cheaper components such as this one noted in the subject that are adjustable however they are simply components and not an entire solution. I've yet to get this piece operational as i know it's missing an on/off switch and not sure what else. I've not had anyone with the requisite experience determine what it needs to make it a functional unit.

Jshwaa
2015.01.28, 09:00 AM
yep, already have one of these. Looking for adjust ability in voltage output though. this seems to be at the high end (12-13+v) on RC power supplies or on very expensive bench lab power supplies. there are much cheaper components such as this one noted in the subject that are adjustable however they are simply components and not an entire solution. I've yet to get this piece operational as i know it's missing an on/off switch and not sure what else. I've not had anyone with the requisite experience determine what it needs to make it a functional unit.

From the looks of the nomenclature used in your pictures, it appears that the supply is configurable for an input voltage of either 110V or 220V, depending on whether or not your short the contacts inside the printed white box labeled "CN4 AC110/220V". I would have to see how the traces go from those points, and the data sheet on the part that those contacts lead to, to know which setting you should use, however you should not worry about getting it wrong if you are connecting to a 110V source. It would be much worse to accidentally have it set for 110V and plug into a 220V source. The net result of having it set to 220V and connected to 110V is that you will have a low output voltage, if any, depending on how it is regulated. The "CN5 POWER-SW" is your power switch, to turn on the power supply. My bet is that shorting the two contacts inside that printed white box simply activates the supply, and you will have regulated 5VDC at the output terminal you have shown.

So, short CN5, and power up the supply. Monitor output voltage to be in your desired ranged. If it is, then I believe we have a winner. If you don't, or something sounds like it is humming or heating up, then cut power and then short CN4. You should then have your power supply working as it should. The worst that can happen is that you could 'possibly' burn one of the on-board fuses, but I would expect that to happen if you erroneously connect to a 220V source.