PDA

View Full Version : New Member


cenracer1
2014.10.23, 10:27 AM
I wanted to introduce myself. I found this site while ordering some parts for my 2 MR02 mini z's. I got these two cars sort of by accident as I had no intention of starting to race in another class. I currently race touring cars 1/10 and have been involved with racing r/c since the late 80's. These cars sort of found a home in my stable when a fellow racer picked up a used track for his x-mods. He was going to play in his basement during the winter months. Of course the track came with a couple of cars that the previous owner didn't want. I couldn't pass up the deal on the cars. After running them I was amazed at how well they handled and they were surprisingly quick given their small size. Mine are completely stock for now. He kept the good car, a fully optioned MR02 that is worth in the neighborhood of $500 or so.

After driving his and mine, I found I got very good at driving both, but his is a bit faster. I will be picking some members brains to make mine closer to his without the high costs involved. I already have many thousands invested in my other cars and these are for now just fun.

We have several other members who purchased or acquired some mini-z's as well, with several being the 4wd variety. From what I have experienced so far, they are much more difficult to drive initially, but they/we are getting faster each time we run them.

I will be looking over the site before asking redundant questions as for setup and the like. One thing I have quickly realized is that the stock rear friction shock has to go. Its OK, but having a racing background, it won't work. Thanks Cenracer

imxlr8ed
2014.10.23, 10:36 AM
Ok, I'll be the first to ask the first question....

Where are you located?

This is how the 1/28th scale addiction began for most of us!

cenracer1
2014.10.23, 10:54 AM
I am located in NW New Jersey. I found out there is a track about an hour from me that has races and some of the members have stopped in. I'm really trying to fight the urge to get into racing with these cars or risk the wrath of my wife again. She does drive occasionally but its not her thing. My son and two daughters love to race and my two daughters 8 and 10 are surprisingly quite good with these cars. My son is like me, races all the time and these cars just demand more focus and better eyesight.

imxlr8ed
2014.10.23, 04:42 PM
We (Reading Mini-Z Racers) are located just off I-76 in SouthEast PA, we've all been over in NJ or NY for races over the years. Maj's in Patterson NJ is probably the one you're talking about. As I have learned, the best way to tune is to talk to seasoned racers and those guys are definitely worth a visit.

Best advice I can give for sight issues? Bright colors and two-tone schemes... that should help the most.

Huge welcome!
We have a race this Sunday the 26th, you're more than welcome to show if the wife allows! ;)

Here's our thread on here:

http://mini-zracer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=39846

here's Maj's thread:

http://mini-zracer.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=105

herman
2014.10.23, 05:55 PM
addiction? what addiction?
welcome to the forums... :D

DMALMAD
2014.10.23, 06:12 PM
At Maj's(214 state st Hackensack) we race every friday. We start around 7:30-8:30 pm and finish around 12 am but the shop opens around 12pm. Come by everyone is nice and willing to help with setup and give advice. It is a great environment and the racing is very competitive. Check out some videos of the races here:
https://www.youtube.com/user/Nnumbberrone
If you are just looking to mess around it is still fun to come and try the track out.

byebye
2014.10.24, 05:29 AM
Welcome to the forums!

Kris

mleemor60
2014.10.24, 07:06 AM
The most important thing for you in the beginning is that you don't get caught up in or subscribe to the "you have to have this to go fast" trap. For a while the car right out of the box will be almost overwhelming. Then you will have a couple more larger pinions to go through for even more of the "demon" speed overtakes your sensibilities and steers you down the dark road infested with the Kool-Aid drinkers that are willing to steer you into the "bling zone".

Unlike the larger scales you will find most of the "Z" racers to be very helpful in keeping you in the game with their best tuning tips. There is no need for secrecy here because the combined knowledge from all the stars in the hobby will do little in helping you beat them. Use the information gained and set your own pace and you will get there.

Welcome aboard.

cenracer1
2014.10.24, 09:20 AM
The most important thing for you in the beginning is that you don't get caught up in or subscribe to the "you have to have this to go fast" trap. For a while the car right out of the box will be almost overwhelming. Then you will have a couple more larger pinions to go through for even more of the "demon" speed overtakes your sensibilities and steers you down the dark road infested with the Kool-Aid drinkers that are willing to steer you into the "bling zone".

Unlike the larger scales you will find most of the "Z" racers to be very helpful in keeping you in the game with their best tuning tips. There is no need for secrecy here because the combined knowledge from all the stars in the hobby will do little in helping you beat them. Use the information gained and set your own pace and you will get there.

Welcome aboard.

I have to admit that I might have been one of those guys that kept all the secrets to larger vehicles to themselves in order to win races, but that fades quickly when you realize you are only playing with expensive "toys". I still have a couple of sectrets with mine, but they are setup secrets and not aftermarket tricks. Like I said earlier, I want to run these cars well and race mainly with my fellow racers on our track. Not necessarily at a race track with other seasoned racers. We deal with that enough.. But I will say you never know. We started the 1/10th scale the same way and a few years later and 30 or so members later. It got ugly so who knows where this will lead. That being said, I love to tinker with setup (obviously) and these cars appear to be limited , but they handle quite well out of the box and with the collective knowledge I can gain here, they will be even better. I look forward to any and all advice as I don't really know much about these other than I can barely see some of the parts. My old eyes don't focus too well anymore. Thank you all in advance for all the help and advice.

As far as tracks go.. A few of my friends have stopped by the track in Hackensack to see it. They came back with the thought that our driving stinks compared to what they saw there. And we thought we were doing well..LOL
I did find out that for racing at least there, 2wd is favored over 4wd but for reasons that haven't been fully explained. One of our fellow racers, our resident tech head and full scale race driver built a 4wd with all the fastest motor and hop ups he could find.. and guess what, he's by far the slowest on the track that we setup. My 8 year old daughter drives around him. So we hear you! Learn to drive first.

imxlr8ed
2014.10.24, 04:19 PM
Best way I can sum it up...

99% skill, the rest is setup... and even that is mostly just having the right tires.

I have been schooled by many, I have even had my own "mediocre" setups driven like there was no issue by racers much more skilled than myself.

That is the attraction, that is the addiction.

Plus, a home track just allows you to build your own skills rain or shine... a huge benefit of the small scale!

mleemor60
2014.10.24, 05:03 PM
One of the biggest mis conceptions that is had by the masses that race these little or any scale car is that they are somehow "toys". These respond to all the same things that a 1/1 scale car does. The trick is figuring out what it wants and then how to give it. They respond hugely to small adjustments. Just be patient and pay close attention to aero. The biggest gains are there and I don't mean hanging a lexan parachute on the rear deck and calling it done.. Study the bodies and compare them to their full scale brothers. There is "gold" to be mined there. And it's free, too.

The advent of the MR-03 has nearly rendered the AWD extinct. They just have way too much parasitic drag with a high center of gravity. What you have seen are super mod cars glued down on foams. An AWD is good on carpet with low traction. In really good hands they can compete decently but at a much higher cost. Both in bling and maintenance on that bling. They can be a dark road.

cenracer1
2014.10.24, 05:40 PM
mleemore60.. I hope you didn't take offence by my toy comment. I refer to anything that is not full scale as toys which these essentially are. Saying that all my planes, helicopters and race cars are essentially toys to me.. No insult intended.. And yes, I take them all very seriously. Just ask my wife.
You mentioned aerodynamics play an important role with these cars. I would assume that its applying downforce to the rear to keep the car planted in turns. I know with my 1/10th cars, its hugely important and its not just for winning the race, but actually finishing. Most good looking bodies aren't very good for racing and if you watch races, they are only running 2 to 3 types at the most. A huge wing will give you downforce if used correctly, but unless you have some in the front, you simply can't turn effectively or worse, the car will flip.
I will be trying to apply some of my racing knowledge to these cars, but I can already see that a lot of it doesn't apply. Different forces are working in these cars that I have to get the hang of. At least I don't have to deal with set up stations and little tiny adjustments that can really wreck your race. These cars have them as well, just done differently. Two things that seem to remain constant across the board.. Driver skill and tire selection..

cowboysir
2014.10.24, 07:54 PM
If I was to compare a Mini-Z to any other scale i'd say they come closest to 1/12 Pan, USGT or 1/10th F1. It's rare that you find any of these larger scales using T-plate for the motor pod but you get the gist of RWD/motor pod/simple damping/basic front suspension.

You and mleemor60 have pretty much nailed the key to mini-z though....don't get caught up in the bling because driver skill and tire selection are the keys to mastering driving these little rockets.

cenracer1
2014.10.25, 09:14 AM
They are definitely similar to pan cars which I have no experience in other than I've driven them occasionally. I have a friend who has a couple, but never raced them or tinkered with them.

Its funny you mentioned the bling because its very easy to get caught up in that but years of racing have taught me to stay away from that. We have a specific race that we do Saturday evenings that essentially works this way.
shut off the lights, only run led lighting to see which car is yours. Modify the heck out of the cars for speed without much regard to handling and run about 10 cars at the same time. Its not for the meek! The key here is to run older or cheaper touring cars with basher bodies. Mine was a 12 year old HPI RS4 with a CC 5700 4 pole running on 3S lipo.. I say was because after a really bad crash, lit up 4 tires at 70+ the car was destroyed. Hit cement head on.. Its funny how a bunch of old guys and women get their kicks. No bling on these cars, just functional parts..

I will have to get up to speed on the tire designations as they are not the same as 1/10th and the different suspension setup. Pods seem so simple, but after looking here, they are not that way and there are quite a number of options as to how to set them up.