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arch2b
2015.06.02, 02:28 PM
http://comingsoon-tech.com/batteriser (Website under construction)

just came across this and thought i'd share with others. sounds good, too good to be true really.

The secret is that most 1.5V batteries drain to about 1.3V and your device stops functioning leaving behind up to 80% of energy.

Using proprietary circuitry to maintain a constant output, Batteriser unleashes all that untapped energy.

could this be the next battery revolution for AAA racing?

lfisminiz
2015.06.02, 09:18 PM
Ray, links not working for me. Sounds hopeful.

Jshwaa
2015.06.02, 10:03 PM
The device boosts voltage, but not overall power output of the cell. Also, the charge boost circuit would add resistance to your motor current. Not ideal for 'cars', despite what the commercial says. There's no free energy.

TheSteve
2015.06.02, 10:17 PM
The device boosts voltage, but not overall power output of the cell. Also, the charge boost circuit would add resistance to your motor current. Not ideal for 'cars', despite what the commercial says. There's no free energy.

+1, it is all kinds of BS.

Jshwaa
2015.06.03, 08:06 AM
Wow, just saw the thing on the front page of Yahoo! today...

What people will appreciate about this 'batteriser' is that for devices which are critical about the 'voltage level' of the cells as it pertains to operation of the device, your device will be tricked into thinking the cells are at a higher charge which will 'possibly' sustain operation a little longer, but only if the device is critical about 'voltage level'.

For example, your pocket MP3 player that runs on AAA or AA cells. The voltage bar on the MP3 player will show a higher level than the voltage of the cells would be without the batteriser. So when you are listening to your MP3 player, you won't be getting the 'red' bar, or a warning about low voltage well before the cells are near completely dead. Once the cells no longer have enough charge to activate the boost circuit, the cells will put out absolutely nothing, whereas without the charge circuit, you may actually squeeze out enough power to drive an LED or something.

The discharge profile of your cells will go from a ramp down to more of a square, but if you add up the area of voltage over current over time, the power output of the cells will be exactly the same, if not less with the batteriser because the device consumes power itself through diodes.

It is a gimmick, playing off of people's ignorance of what power is, because most of us think that 'voltage' is all there is.

arch2b
2015.06.03, 01:26 PM
thanks for the responses :p glad we have access to this kind of knowledge here. :cool: