PDA

View Full Version : TRP Battery Manager ?


Blf
2017.01.05, 11:56 AM
Hey guys - any advice on a way to test aaa's for resistance and overall life ? I'm noticing some of our community packs when racing are not holding charge as well anymore and have some of them mixed in with newer Batts - I want to essentially weed out the week ones.

Any ideas?

briankstan
2017.01.05, 03:15 PM
you can do this with the TRP Battery Manager. I have one and it reads the batteries while underload. I just tossed the bad ones and made new sets based on the readings.

tommy_greeneyes
2017.01.06, 04:45 AM
I agree that is an awesome tool. I have it too and it's helped a lot

Blf
2017.01.09, 08:44 PM
Nice --- I just ordered one!

So is there a certain level I want to use as a "cutoff" as far as tossing the bad ones?

briankstan
2017.01.10, 09:10 AM
you'll certainly see the difference when you use the Battery manager. I just numbered my batteries for a quick reference. then you can actually upload the data into their site and sort them.

I'd take the bottom ones and either toss them or just use them for bashing batteries. maybe cycle them to a use in a flashlight or something. :)

EMU
2017.01.10, 02:35 PM
Not sure what amperage the matcher uses to analyze the cells. The more load put on a cell, the lower the operating voltage will be.

Stock class cells you will want a higher cutoff voltage, with lower load. Something like 1.2v at 1A discharge. My numbers are just estimates, but should get you in the ballpark.

Mod cells, you would use a bigger discharge with a lower cutoff, like 1.1v at 3A or so.

Stock class cells, you want the highest voltage cells, and cells that stay at the higher voltage range for the extent of the race. Voltage equals speed on Stock motors.

Mod, you want them to be able to keep decent voltage under heavier load without dropping as much. Since you Typically have more motor than you need, the highest voltages are less relevant, but you want to ensure that they can run the distance without overheating and dumping.

Lower internal resistance cells are more suited to Stock motor, mid range internal resistance more suited for Mod.

I typically do not use my stock cells for Mod racing. They will offer too much punch initially, then drop off midway through the run to a more controllable level. I prefer a cell that gives more consistent power delivery throughout the run. Stock, you want as much power as you can get for the entire run.

Blf
2017.01.12, 12:21 AM
Thanks for the info on this guys ! Brian .... What reading are you looking at to determine whether they stay in the lineup or go?

EMU - great guidelines on where to use what Batts

What's the cut-off point for good vs get rid of it.

briankstan
2017.01.12, 02:41 PM
Thanks for the info on this guys ! Brian .... What reading are you looking at to determine whether they stay in the lineup or go?

so when yo upload your batteries data to their "cloud" you can sort them but their data for say a 5, 8, 10, 15, and 20 minute run. based on that data you can sort them into sets.

most of my batteries were say between 1230 and 1135 over 24 sets. I did have a few that were down in the 900 range. those are the ones that got tossed.

for best results you want to discharge the cells to 0.9v and then fully charge them prior to running them on the Battery Manager, the manager simulates a race run for 20 minutes. I stopped mine just after 10 because we typically never run longer than that so I didn't need the data for longer runs.

hope that helps.

Blf
2017.01.13, 03:20 AM
Thanks Brian great info - so just condition them first back to full charge then use batt manager to simulate then sort accordingly.

Or does the trp do the discharge as you mentioned?

briankstan
2017.01.13, 08:29 AM
Thanks Brian great info - so just condition them first back to full charge then use batt manager to simulate then sort accordingly.

Or does the trp do the discharge as you mentioned?

you can use pretty much any of the dischargers out there, I use the PN one but if you are using like a Lacrosse or Powerex charger you can use that as well.

the main thing is to use the batteries how you maintain them and make sure they are fully charged before using the battery manager for best results.