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Old 2018.11.18, 11:39 PM   #1
jkpeters84
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Metal parts vs stock replacements

Which metals parts are worth the upgrade? Which stock parts are just as good?
I seen so many people fully dress they are with metal parts that looks ugly. I know they cars need to be lite for speed and the aluminum part are for strength. Where is the line with mini's? Also what are some of the weak spots on a mini?
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Old 2018.11.19, 10:10 AM   #2
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I used to be a "bling" kool-aid drinker kind of guy. I still have a few chassis that have a lot of alloy but nowadays i tend to replace just the front knuckles for strength and T-plates/tires/front springs for overall chassis feel

Some alloy does improve performance (for example having an alloy motor mount can allow for minute gearing changes) but at my level of competition i realized its a bit of a wasted effort.

Decide how far you want to go (performance wise) and research which elements improve aspects of handling.
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Old 2018.11.19, 11:41 AM   #3
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I agree with CowboySir, knuckles are really the only part that is likely to break, and will be made better with alloy.

One thing I learned with 1/10 scale is that something WILL break, and if you go adding aluminum parts to everything, then it's the most expensive thing that will break, like your transmission or chassis. You WANT to leave some cheap, breakable plastic in your build so it can be easily replaced and doesn't cause something more important to fail.

That said, Mini-Zs have a lot less mass, and just don't break as often. If I had to rank things I've broken or seen broken over the years, it's a short list:

1. knuckles
2. T-plates (which
3. chassis front; either the parts that hold the kingpin, or the mounting areas where the nose clip and/or bumpers attach.

Almost all the other damage I have witnessed has been to the body.

PN has the double-A arm setup, as well as a static aluminum upper and lower brace, but these require sawing chunks off the chassis, and are pretty expensive. I've used them in the past when I broke the chassis and it was the only way to keep it running, but the last time it happened I switched to a PN chassis instead.

Last thing I would add is I like ball diffs and find them to be a worthwhile upgrade, especially if you have turn/power issues.
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Old 2018.11.19, 01:21 PM   #4
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My suggestions are similar. Things to upgrade to allow are short. T-plate adapter, front body clip adapter and 4th servo gear. I dont mind the plastic knuckles personally, and find that using a front wheel that is .5-1mm narrower than the recommended wheel, you almost never break a knuckled. But, breaking the knuckle means that something else didnt break.

On thing hinted but not stated, is that plastic will bend and return to position or break. Alloy will bend and stay bent. You can be scratching your head trying to figure out a handling issue, and never find it until you see the bent piece of alloy. I have had this happen more times than I can remember.

Ally motormounts are nice, but not exactly necessary unless you need a wider gear range than available on the stock mount. Some are relatively inexpensive, and some are half the cost of the car. I like the Kyosho MM2 plastic mount, which integrates a disc damper. It is compatible with many 94 and 98mm bodies, but not all due to clearance issues on some bodies. It even has axle height adjustment, and can be found for under $15. By far the best value for MR03 stock class racing.
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Old 2018.11.19, 01:37 PM   #5
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We run a stock class with a 70t motor and I believe i’ve Broken maybe two plastic parts in the last year. If your breaking a lot of parts, I would argue that your inherently downing something wrong. Proper offsets will prevent wheels sticking out and grabbing walls or other cars. The most offensive plastic part I continue to have on my cars is the MM2 motor cover as that darned thing seems to be near impossible to simply pop off without breaking off the side tab, which isn’t really needed apparently as I haven’t had one in ages. Other than that, I’ve broken T plates more often in accidents than anything else and those are cheap. I would rather break a cheap part than one that costs twice as much. Even though our stock class allows CF T plates, I continue to run stock plastic.

I don’t run LM cars but I hear these motor mounts are keen to breaking at the outside screw point for the T plate. They are cheap enough to replace however sourcing them seems to be less consistent which I can understand would be the source of frustration.

I am by far, more frustrated in bending an aluminum upper arm or knuckle than I am in poping out and in a plastic version of the same.

Once you get into more advance classes, you simply can’t avoid getting some aluminum parts like motor mounts. I would also argue that more people move to aluminum simply because they enjoy the hop-up aspect of the hobby vs. a real need.

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Old 2018.11.19, 02:20 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arch2b View Post
...... I would also argue that more people move to aluminum simply because they enjoy the hop-up aspect of the hobby vs. a real need.

agreed! Or at least it was that way when I was in the hobby years ago. Folks loved to point out their hop ups and if they were all anodized the same color, well, that was bonus points!
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Old 2018.11.19, 03:41 PM   #7
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I think in the current economy of the hobby, there is less emphasis on bling and more about price efficiency of competitiveness.

Spend the least to get the best performing car. My fastest laps at yesterday's race was with one of our rental cars, which were built up to our kyosho stock spec. All things said and done, it's under $200 including transmitter. This car outperformed cars with 3x as much money put into them, with the same caliber driver. You really only need all of the bells and whistles when you have enormous space with a very high flow and high corner speed layout. Mid size layouts or smaller, the differences beyond tires and spring/damping, are not very noticeable. This is why in the northeast, where we typically race on medium sized circuits with tighter corners, or stock level classes with minimal upgrades are flourishing and competing head to head with open stock level classes to the point that it makes me think whether an open stock class is even needed.
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Old 2018.11.19, 04:04 PM   #8
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heh, more often than not:

"Wow, that car is driving great! What is it?"

"Oh, it's my box-stock MR03 with fresh tires."
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Old 2018.11.19, 04:38 PM   #9
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People always think that you need to upgrade so much to get these cars working. Initially, I had that approach... but over the years, i realized how little was actually needed to be competitive. Sure, with certain upgrades, you have much finer control over adjustments, but overall, the Kyosho design works very well. Perhaps this is why many aftermarket support has abandoned the Mini-Z...

Once you get into modified motors, and more power, things start to change a little, but overall, its a pretty solid setup out of the box, only needing t-plate, damper and tires for the most part (now that bearings come with most cars).

Wheel nuts... add wheel nuts to the list.
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Old 2018.11.19, 08:22 PM   #10
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The LM rear pod usually only breaks when you put a PN motor in the car and don't grind out the tight areas. Keep a Kyosho stock motor in the car and you will not have a issue. The PN motor is bigger in diameter on the pinion side of the can right were the bearing is. This makes the motor stress the rear pod so when you get in a accident the pod ends up breaking.
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Old 2018.11.19, 08:38 PM   #11
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or like you noted, ream out the spacer a tad. I don't recall this being difficult to do.
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Old 2018.11.20, 10:55 PM   #12
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Hmmm.... jump onto the "bling bandwagon" and your money can swirl down the never ending money pit faster than you can say "abracadabra where'd all my money go?" All replies above were quite on point... and I agree with them

Just get the bare essentials... with tires being the most important "upgrade"... I think it was emu that said tires are anywhere from 80-90% of your setup... and I do agree that the cars are great out of the box... it's when that speed bug bites you and want to go faster, believing that all this "bling" might translate to a faster car with faster lap times...

Another facfor might be where you race.... do not give in to the "bling" side.... Keep it simple, change the broken part (keep it plastc) it's cheaper that way and you have more fun without the fear of busting the bank...

Some of the cars that I have most fun driving, remains stock or close to stock... faster cars tend to get broken or damaged... i try to optimize my car as cheaply as possible... hahaha

That would mean tires, bearings, and maybe springs (but mostly keep them stock)..
If I want to go faster, an x-speed motor.. and maybe a ball diff...

I keep the tplate plastic till they break, then go to a very soft one...

Hope this helps... enjoy the hobby

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Old 2018.11.21, 08:10 AM   #13
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Lets not discount those that simply like to tinker... there is a large subset of people that may not even race that simply like to build and tinker. I fell into this category for a long time in that I did not build for performance but for curiosity and interest in tinkering with the cars. I donít mind a little aluminum for aluminum sake when it makes sense. I typically run Kyosho CE28N wheels which look fantastic but I also pick them up cheap form asian shops. Most of my above 70T cars have aluminum upper arms as well which may not be necessary but they are not overly expensive, look nice and are stiffer than stock plastic.

Letís be careful in recommendations that we also simply do not likewise dissuade others from having fun, as that is the ultimate goal in the hobby. Just take the recommendations as a guide that needless spending on aluminum parts is not required for a well handling car. Pick and choose what interests you and have fun with it . Just donít feel pressured into buying a lot of parts just to keep up with others as more often than not, simple practice will pay more dividends more than more parts.
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Old 2018.11.21, 10:11 AM   #14
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I love to tinker as well, and have played with just about every part available for these cars. Some parts are worth the investments, for fine tuning and aesthetic appeal. Remember, if you really like your car, that can make it faster just because you get into driving it more and enjoy the experience.

The cars dont take much as far as hop ups to make them good, but to go from good to great... can take quite a bit. The primary benefit of many hop ups, is the ability to very finely adjust setup. As well as to adjust weight bias, center of gravity and a plethora of other options. Sometimes, a body and relatively stock chassis just click, other times you need to go off the diving board to get a setup to work well. A big part of the fun that I have in this hobby is trying to make the "bad" bodies work, or run very unique arrangements.
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Old 2018.11.21, 01:38 PM   #15
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Like many others have said, there are only a small # of plastic parts I've broken and replaced with alloy/carbon fibre: front knuckles, MM motor pod, t-plate, those all eventually cracked after enough hard hits from racing in box stock class. In some cases I just put in another plastic part, since most about $10 or less and lasted for over a year in my case. For upgrades that make a performance difference: tires, bearings, front springs, top oil shock or disc damper. After that I agree with others comments that many of the other alloy upgrades allow you to fine tune: ride height, gear mesh, driving style

I will say that one of the most surprising non-alloy upgrades I added to one of my faster cars was a lexan wing. I was amazed at how much more stable the car drove on the higher speed sections of the track, and made the car much more constant and predictable. This was after a couple years of club racing without a rear wing, so the difference was immediately noticeable. I guess aero matters
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